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Seattle’s Alki Point and Alki Point Lighthouse

What do you envision yourself doing on an active summer night? Long walks along the boulevard, strolling parallel to the water’s edge? Watching ships come and go in the bay, like the ebb and flow of the ever-changing tide?

Or do you prefer sand-life? Playing beach volleyball or lounging while the sun basks overhead? Listening the wave lap against the shoreline, the smell of fresh coffee and summer bonfires in the air?

Seattle’s Alki Point and Alki Point Lighthouse

West Seattle’s Alki Avenue SW has all thisand more!

Seattle’s Alki Beach is a plethora of fun and a buzz from dawn until dusk during warm summer nights. It’s the key ingredient to a picture-perfect summer day, but it’s definitely a great spot year-round. But with summer right around the corner, why wait?

Beachcombers, sunbathers, bicyclists and strollers are out in full-swing, enjoying the widened path that accommodates increased foot traffic and extra parking along Alki Avenue SW.

Picnic tables, a bathhouse turned art studio and restroom are at the south end of the beach, where you’ll also find a monument depicting the arrival of the first European explorers in the area. Don’t forget your hand-carry boat! There’s access between 53rd Avenue SW and 55th Avenue SW, along west property line.

Alki Point & the Alki Point Lighthouse

If you keep walking, you’ll cross Alki Point, where the Alki Point Lighthouse stands and currently functions as a fully-automated aid-to-navigation on an active US Coast Guard site. The Alki Point is one of eight lighthouses around the Puget Sound that’s seasonally open to visitors, so keep an eye out!

Back in its early days…

West Seattle and Alki Beach hold a long-standing place in Seattle’s heart. It’s the landing site of where European settlers first stepped on the land now called West Seattle. Chief Seattle and his tribe greeted them and helped them establish their settlement to stave off the cold, wet winters of the Pacific Northwest.

By 1902 the beach was so popular that it became the destination of the new electric street railway line, “all the way from Seattle.”

Even in its earlier days it was a hotbed of activity. It seems a bit silly now, but it prompted Chas. Looff to build an elaborate amusement park on pilings at the Duwamish Head, the piling of which you can still see during low tide!

Not only was it the first municipal saltwater beach on the west coast, but he Alki Bathhouse, which was built in 1911, was the first of its kind.

Even though a fire razed the park in 1931, the park is still remembered for its beauty and enjoyed by many Seattleites and visitors. A small replica of a New York City statue was gifted from Reginald H. Parsons and the Seattle Council of the Boy Scouts of America in 1952.

If you enjoy spectacular views of the Olympic Peninsula and Mountains and the beautiful Puget Sound, all of which frame the flotilla of ferries, sailboats, steamships and other watercraft that ply the Puget Sound waters.

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